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WithinReach ICC Updates: COFA Migrants

[Image Right: U.S. Commodore Ben Wyatt addresses inhabitants of Bikini Atoll in 1946, moments before they were removed and relocated. (Carl Mydans/Time)]

Introducing a New Blog Category!

At WithinReach we have committed to improving overall health and health equity as one of our Strategic Direction priorities. For the last decade here at WithinReach, we have had an internal staff committee, the Intercultural Competence Committee (ICC), dedicated to recognizing, respecting, and responding to diversity within ourselves, our organization, and our community. Cultural competence at WithinReach is a commitment to promoting equity through culturally responsive evolution of behavior, policy, and organizational structure. We are working to foster awareness and appreciation of the diversity of our clients, our partners and ourselves. All policies and programs reflect WithinReach’s value of cultural responsiveness and promote health equity.

Every month we have an internal staff training and discussion on a different topic pertaining to the diversity and inclusion of different groups in our community. We hope to use this new blog category to share back with you what we, our community partners, and our leaders are learning and talking about! We are dedicated to the work that we think is important to our community.

Next week, we are looking forward to hosting this quarter’s Washington Coalition on Medicaid Outreach (WCOMO) in Federal Way with the topic of Health Insurance and accessibility for The Compact of Free Association (COFA) migrants in our community. Last year, several of our Outreach staff attended the COFA Community Forum and learned about the history of the The Compact of Free Association Treaty and history with the United States. Currently, COFA migrants are excluded from accessing federal programs like Medicaid. This quarter’s WCOMO panel will feature a discussion with Michael Itti, Executive Director, Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA)   and Senator Rebecca Saldaña, Senator from the 37th Legislative District about the current state of health care access for COFA migrants and the upcoming legislative session for bills HB 1291 and SB 5683 and what could change. 

For more information on COFA migrants and history, see below!

Comprehensive background article on the history of nuclear testing in COFA nations and present-day situation (Washington Post)

Migration history from COFA territories (Mother Jones)

The legacy of radiation exposure in Micronesia(Social Medicine)

Tags: COFA   COFA migrants   Health   Health Equity   health insurance   ICC   Intercultural Competency   

“On Immunity: An Inoculation”

It’s not too often that a new book about immunizations hits the shelves. And it’s even less often that a book on immunizations from a National Book Critics Circle Award-winning essayist is published. Much of my reading for work involves publications in medical journals or things like the CDC’s “Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases” (say that three times fast) – while full of information that is both useful and fascinating, they’re not exactly page-turners. So I was excited to pick up “On Immunity: An Inoculation” by Eula Biss.

Eula Biss approaches the topic as a mother and essayist, not as a scientist or advocate, and she blends poignant stories from her own experiences of birth and motherhood with philosophical contemplation. Rather than focusing on the science of immunization, she asks the question, what does it mean to be vaccinated? What does it mean to be immune to diseases? What are the cultural implications and contexts of choosing to be immunized, or to forgo immunizations?

The book is short – just 163 pages – and Biss’ prose is tight, so while she touches on sources ranging from her conversations with other mothers to Greek philosophy to Victorian gothic novels, her tangents never ramble. Susan Sontag’s work on illness as a metaphor is a huge influence on her, and Dracula (yes, the vampire) makes several appearances as well. She explores the culture of fear that impacts the choices many parents make, and the constant tension between individual freedom and the collective good that marks American discourse.

On this last note, she addresses the work of a prominent promoter of an “alternative,” un-researched and un-proven immunization schedule who recommends delaying some immunizations and skipping others. A few years ago, one of his patients got measles and went on to infect several vulnerable children and infants in their school and in a different doctor’s waiting room:

“In Dr. Bob’s world, another doctor’s waiting room is not his concern and public health is entirely independent of individual health. ‘This is an important vaccine from a public health standpoint,’ he writes of the hep B vaccine, ‘but it’s not as critical from an individual point of view.’ In order for this to make sense, one must believe that individuals are not part of the public. Public health, Dr. Bob suggests, is not our health.” (p 108-109)

Both my professional training in public health and my personal values lead me to believe in the “us,” not just the “me.” The public is made up of individuals, and the biological reality is that the choices we make affect each other in myriad ways. And although immunizations offer us extraordinary protection as individuals, I also value them for how they protect those around us as well. I think this is true not just of immunizations, but of our passion for promoting healthy families throughout the work we do at WithinReach: When families have the resources they need to be healthy, we all benefit.
If you loved your English and philosophy classes but loathed science, this is definitely the immunization book for you. And if you loved science and are having a hard time wrapping your brain around why some folks aren’t leaping at the opportunity to immunize their children, this book will offer some insight. Anybody who cares about public health but, more deeply, what our collective obligations to each other are in a democratic community will enjoy this thoughtful read.

 

Tags: Health   immunizations   preventable diseases   Protect   Public Health   vaccination   

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