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The CEO Perspective

Building Communities that are Inclusive, Healthy & Safe

When we devote our life’s work to the betterment of our communities, our society, and the world – it is incredibly difficult to witness the hate, pain and injustice of recent events – for it goes against everything we believe in.

After engaging in powerful conversations as a staff these past couple weeks, and processing together our sadness and despair over what occurred in Charlottesville on August 12th, we feel compelled to speak out, as individuals and as an agency.

We condemn the white supremacy, violence, and racist actions we witnessed in Charlottesville, and the prevalent hate that so many people in our country are facing every day. We feel obliged to turn quickly and clearly toward justice and inclusion, and to take positive steps toward equity each day.

As a result, we dedicated the top priority in our 2017-2019 Strategic Framework to Improving Overall Health and Health Equity in Washington State. We are committed to creating a plan to increase equity in all parts of our work. To start, we have identified ways to reduce our individual and organizational bias through inter-cultural competency trainings, self-reflection, and group discussion. Through this hard work, it has become clear to us that we cannot strive for health equity without acknowledging that implicit bias and racism are intrinsically tied to the health inequities experienced by our clients and the communities we serve on a daily basis.

We know undeniably that we don’t have all the answers or solutions, but we are certain that we must band together for peace, equity, and justice because together we are stronger than the hate around us. Together we can ensure that every family has an equitable opportunity to thrive.

We welcome your help in building communities that are inclusive, healthy and safe. To learn more about Implicit Bias visit the Perception Institute, or about Implicit Bias in Healthcare, consider reading this series by Dustyn Addington, at the Foundation for Healthy Generations.

-Kay Knox

Tags: CEO   Charlottesville   Communities   Hate   Health Equity   Implicit Bias   inclusion   inequities   justice   Safe   

Celebrating, Learning and Leaping

As the leaves turn colors and fall from the trees, I am reminded in this season more than any other, that life is a series of beginnings and endings and beginnings. This is how it goes. There are things to celebrate and things to grieve, there are old journeys to remember and learn from, and there are new ways of thinking to be explored.
In this season of reflection, we are doing just that. We are looking back and celebrating the things we accomplished over the past 3 years to help families across Washington live healthier, safer lives. Astoundingly, over the last three years our staff informed more than 1,000,000 people about critical health and nutrition supports available to them.

More specifically, we helped more than 32,000 families enroll in health insurance, and nearly 18,000 access in the WIC nutrition program. In addition, we provided 232,000 families with information on immunizations, informed 174,000 families about local breastfeeding resources, and provided 227,000 families with information on free summer meals programs in their neighborhoods. Beyond the numbers, we helped set the stage for a coordinated statewide Help Me Grow network, became recognized as national experts in addressing vaccine hesitancy, and our Healthy Connections Model is widely known to be an effective and efficient model for addressing the social determinants of health.

Now we are looking ahead and exploring, as Seth Godin says, “the space between where we are now, and where we want to be, ought to be, are capable of being.” He describes this as a gap between our reality and our possibility, and notes that if we imagine the gap as a huge gulf or crevasse we will surely be paralyzed.

Rather he suggests that “the magic of forward movement is seeing the space as leap-sized, as something that persistent, consistent effort can get you through.” Herein is the grace—our work is to hold tight to a strong vision, while taking one step at a time toward a new reality.

Over the next several months our Board and Staff will work together to define a new 3-year strategic direction for our work. We know we want our new direction to be nimble and bold, in every way rooted in our strong history of service, capacity-building and advocacy, and inspired by our unending belief that every family deserves to be healthy and safe.

We look forward to having you join us on the journey ahead, in leap-sized strides, making sure that every family can be healthy and safe!

Tags: benefit programs   health insurance   hunger   Public Health   Washington state   WithinReach   

We are all pathways of hope

When I tell people the story of WithinReach – how we connect families across Washington to the resources they need to be healthy – without fail, the response I get is, “wow, you must really give people hope.” Better yet, when someone witnesses our staff in action, working directly with families – respectfully exploring their needs, patiently describing the available resources, making sure they know the next steps on the path, and bolstering their will to advocate for their health – the observer invariably says something like: “you could just hear the hope in her voice.”Though I have experienced this over and over in my years at WithinReach, telling people that we are in the business of increasing hope always seems like an insufficient outcome for our work.  Assuming, of course, that hope is a nice ‘extra,’ not a critical marker of success.  Turns out I was wrong.  We are absolutely, powerfully, in the business of hope.

At the recent Science of Hope Conference, hosted by our friends at the Foundation for Healthy Generations, I learned that hope can be measured, and it plays a key role in well-being. Research psychologists have identified 24 character strengths, that when maximized, help people flourish.  These strengths help us cope with stress and adversity, AND, it turns out that hope is the top predictor of well-being!

There are 3 key elements in the theory of hope. First, we need a desirable goal; next we need a viable pathway or pathways to reach our goal, and last, we need the will or energy to move along the path to our goal.

This is actually the PERFECT description of the work we do with families every day. The families who reach out to us have critically desirable goals – whether it is a young woman who thinks she might be pregnant and doesn’t know what to do next, or a single Dad who has lost his job and can’t provide enough food for kids, or a newly re-located family who doesn’t know how to get connected to early intervention services for their son who has autism – everyone is driven to help their family be as healthy as possible.

Our work is about helping people find pathways to their goals, and feeling supported to move along the path, no matter the roadblocks that come their way.

Keynote speaker Professor Chan Hellman painted hope as a social gift, and each of us as a pathway of hope for others. It’s real, our work is about hope.

Tags: Family Health Hotline   Foundation for Healthy Generations   Science of Hope   WithinReach   

Learning Our Way Through

Leading a non-profit organization that creates real social impact in the world today is harder than ever. We all work at high speed to keep up with the VUCA world we live in – a world of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.

At WithinReach, we believe in growing leadership capacity from within.  And so, we regularly ask ourselves: what leadership competencies will help us create the greatest impact for the families, and how do we grow them?  A recent blog post by Nancy Winship at the Waldron Group, suggests that to meet the demands of the complicated, ever-changing landscape in which we work, we must be able to ‘learn our way through’ – becoming competent in discernment, resilience, courage, tolerance/respect and above all, self-awareness – the honest assessment of how we show up in our work as leaders, and in which areas we need to grow.

Most non-profit organizations find it hard to devote adequate, if any, resources to leadership development.  We are no different, but we are committed to being different.  We want to ensure that our staff gain the competencies they need to lead successfully in our dynamic world.

Every day, we are learning our way through together…to make the connections WA families need to be healthy.
 

Tags: leadership   nonprofit   Washington state   WithinReach   

Back to school…every day!

As our daughter, Mari, gets ready to start her sophomore year of high school, we are preparing ourselves for another year of learning. New experiences, new challenges, and yes, the back to school forms and the endless school lunches!   Through it all, I sense her excitement.
Preparing for her next year of learning makes me reflect on my own learning during my first year as CEO at WithinReach.  I have learned a great deal in the 16 years I have worked at WithinReach, but I have learned more about what makes this incredible organization excel in the last 12 months than ever before.  I want to share just a few of my learnings with you now; I hope they resonate with you when you think of us.

Leadership legacy is a gift.  I started my new role with the recognition that I was stepping into it on the heels of amazing leaders – the women who envisioned, started, and grew WithinReach.  Over the last year, I have channeled them often, AND I have learned from each and every member of our Board, all of whom have become teachers and guides for me.  For 27 years, WithinReach has been blessed with the strength of smart, committed leaders.   This history of strong leadership provides the vision, strategy, and stability we need to serve more families each year.

Trust is key. Over the last year, I have learned that the key to our success is trust.  Do the families we serve every day trust that we will make the connections they need to live healthy lives? Do our donors trust that we will help them fulfill their vision for a healthier Washington?  Do staff trust that their supervisors will help them do their best and more? Does the Board trust me to build on the successes of the past? I believe the answer is yes, because we are an organization that values integrity, quality, and compassion – all important pieces to building trust.

Plans are only as a good as they are nimble. As we continue to work our 3-year strategic plan, it is clear that our plans must bend and sway to match our ever-changing world.  Our vision is a constant: everything we do is aimed at ensuring that all families have quality health care and adequate nutritious food to eat.  And yet, when a measles outbreak hits like it did this year, we must be ready to respond – to redouble our efforts to ensure that every child in Washington is protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.  It is our nimble, innovative, dynamic nature that makes us a true agent for change.

The CEO role is exciting and exhausting. It goes without saying that the CEO role is a big one, and my days are busier than ever before.  They are busy because the opportunities to improve the health of all families in our state are beyond measure, and because the staff at WithinReach stand ready to examine, develop and implement each opportunity.  Our smart, caring, and committed staff push themselves harder every day to make the connections WA families need to be healthy. I can only follow their lead.

One thing I know for sure… if my second year as CEO is anything like my first, I will learn new things each day.   So, here’s to going back to school…every day!

 

 

Tags: Back to School   CEO   Public Health   Washington state   WithinReach   

Transformative Generosity

“I know that donations to WithinReach are very wise investments in our children and families, and I appreciate the hard work and dedication you all put into the work of the organization.”

This was a long-standing donor and friend of WithinReach—Carolyn Gleason’s—response when we called to thank her for fulfilling her annual pledge, and to ask her if she would continue to support our work on behalf of kids and families.   Her answer over the phone was:  “Of course!”, and then she sent the follow-up message above.

We were so pleased by her response, because this is exactly how we would like our supporters to think of us: as a ‘good investment.”   A wonderful book titled “The Generosity Network” describes that ‘true generosity is rooted in relatedness.’  The authors note that all of us have vision for a better world; it is when we are able to connect with individuals and organizations who share our vision that real transformation happens in the world.

WithinReach makes the connections Washington families need to be healthy – and our connection with Carolyn and others like her are some of the most important connections we make on behalf of children and families.

Through our connection, we are investing in healthy communities, one family at a time.

 

Tags: Washington state   WithinReach   

Coloring Isn’t Just for Kids

I have never worked with a more productive group of people.
WithinReach staff get SO much done!

The last few weeks have been insanely busy for us. Responding to a wave of media requests in reaction to the recent measles, coordinating stakeholders across the state to help pass Breakfast After the Bell legislation, helping thousands of families apply for or renew their Apple Health coverage, bringing our experience and expertise with the Affordable Care Act to a Health Benefit Exchange Board meeting, attending listening sessions with the US Surgeon General, Vivek Murthy, MD, during his visit to Washington…..The list goes on and on – and our staff are always ready to step up, to say ‘yes’, to dig in and do more to make the connections WA families need to be healthy. Though this may be a recipe for success, it most certainly creates some stress.

That’s why I decided to share a recent Huffpost article at our staff meeting this week. The article, Coloring Isn’t Just For Kids. It Can Actually Help Adults Combat Stress., says that it has been found that coloring – that’s right, crayons and coloring books – has the power to reduce stress. In fact, the article says coloring “generates wellness, quietness and also stimulates brain areas related to motor skills, the senses and creativity”.

Many of us are ‘yellow pad doodlers’, so this makes sense. Not only did I share the article, but I offered staff the opportunity to color during staff meeting and beyond. Staff jumped in, and the accompanying picture highlights the result of our staff meeting coloring.

I realize coloring will not reduce the demands placed on our staff, or the crazy fast pace with which they work, but perhaps it brought a small moment of quietness to the day – and hopefully, the message that we care about the health and well-being of all WA families – including our own.

 

Tags: Affordable Care Act   Breakfast After the Bell   coloring   creativity   Health Benefit Exchange   Huffpost   Measles   stress-relief   vaccines   Washington Apple Health   Washington families   Washington state   WithinReach   

Immunization Promotion Hits Close To Home!

Yesterday over breakfast I read an opinion piece in The Seattle Times titled, “The rich and anti-vaccine quacks”, which draws attention to the fact that many parents in California, as in other states, are choosing not to vaccinate their kids. The columnist is outraged that this choice on behalf of “anti-vaxxers” puts public health at risk. Though this is not new news to me as the CEO of an organization that works hard to improve public health by encouraging vaccination, it became even more relevant and personal later in the day when I received word from my daughter’s Seattle high school that they have confirmed two cases of Pertussis, or Whooping Cough.
This is where my professional life and personal life cross. Like the columnist, I was frustrated and a bit outraged to receive this information from the school. Whooping Cough is a very serious illness, and is one of many vaccine preventable diseases. Though my daughter is fully immunized, my Mom brain began to spin – “Mari can’t get sick, she has way too much going on, she’s just getting up to speed as a freshman in high school, missing school would set her back, and what about kayak practice and her driver’s education course…”. Then my administrator brain activated – “Pertussis is highly contagious, what if it spread?, how many kids will get sick?, how will the school manage this?”… and finally, I ended up back at outrage – “why is my daughter’s school even having to deal with this?, I want them to focus on educating her, not addressing an avoidable health crisis!” I do not know the circumstances of the cases, nor the immunization status of the sick students, but I do know that we must use these scary moments to inspire positive action.
So, after yesterday, I am more passionate than ever about the protection immunization provides us all, and our work at WithinReach aimed at promoting immunization across the lifespan. Specifically, I am committed to our work to normalize immunization as a community priority. Our project called the Immunity Community reminds parents that the social norm is to vaccinate (the majority of us fully immunize on time and on schedule), and supports parents in conveying publicly WHY we vaccinate: the health and well-being of our entire community.

 

Tags: Anti-vaccine   Community Health   Immunization   kids health   Pertussis   preventable diseases   protection   Public Health   vaccinate   Whopping Cough   

An Unusual Birthday Gift!

WithinReach’s mission is to make the connections Washington families need to be healthy. Recently, my spouse and I did something that isn’t usually associated with that idea. Our daughter, Mari, turned 15 recently, and we gave her an unusual birthday gift. With the help of Jamie Clausen, attorney at Phinney Estate Law , my spouse and I updated our wills. Though this was clearly not on Mari’s birthday wish list, it was a powerful gift nonetheless. Making sure our children will be taken care of, in the event something happens to us, is one more way we parents help ensure the health and safety of the next generation.

I met Jamie Clausen some years ago and was immediately impressed by the thoughtful way she approached and approaches, what is for most of us, a daunting task. Considering it is based on our worst collective nightmare – not being here for our children— Jamie does an excellent job of taking care of our families.

Jamie also encourages clients who are updating their wills to consider using the process to support other things they care deeply about. Any client who includes a gift of $500 or more in his/her will to one of Phinney Estate Law’s charities of choice (including WithinReach), receives a significant discount. In fact, Phinney Estate Law is so committed to proactive planning that they dedicate at least 25% of their practice to pro bono services and free classes.

We both included gifts to WithinReach in our wills (of course!), and were rewarded with the discount; though, the best reward of all is knowing that Mari will be taken care of, no matter what.

Is it time to create or update your will? If so, consider calling Jamie at Phinney Estate Law. You will be giving yourself and your family a valuable gift. And, if you decide to give towards one of the “charities of choice”, please keep WithinReach in mind!

*Find other legal services in your area by going to our legal resources page through the ParentHelp123 website.

 

Tags: Jamie Clausen   Legal Services   ParentHelp123   Phinney Estate Law   Washington state   Wills   WithinReach   

A Few Words on Marketing

I love short blog posts, but am not usually able to write them. I love them, because honestly they are often the only ones I manage to read. Unfortunately, when I get started writing, it’s hard to stop.
My grandfather who was an attorney, once said to my mother, “Gosh, she never stops talking, she’d make a great attorney!” Though, I did not get a law degree, my friends and family can tell you, I have not stopped talking.
Blogger, Seth Godin wrote a very short blog post recently that resonated with me. He wrote:
Marketing used to be what you say. Now, marketing is what you do. What you make. How you act. The choices you make when you are sure no one is looking.
Here’s my short response: At WithinReach, we struggle to find the right words to say, to help people understand the importance of our work. We won’t stop trying to find those right words, but in the meantime, I firmly believe that our work, our staff, and our impact tells our story – even when no one is looking.

Our Best Work, Fearlessly Every Day

I was inspired by a recent Seth Godin blogpost entitled “The Shortlist”.
I encourage you to read the brief post, but in essence, Seth writes about what it takes to be on the shortlist. He refers to the shortlist as the respected, admired – ‘obvious choice’ – individuals or groups who are always top-of-mind when you want to get something done.
The question he asks is: ‘how do you get on the shortlist’? I realize now, our staff asks that question every day – how can we be on the shortlist among policymakers, how do we stay on the shortlist of our major donors, and are we on the shortlist of hunger relief or immunization thought leaders locally and nationally? More generally, is WithinReach top of mind when it comes to family health?
Seth concludes that people don’t make it on the shortlist just because they deserve it, or even because they are talented, or solely because they are lucky. Instead, he writes:
“No, the shortlist requires more than that. Luck, sure, but also the persistence of doing the work in the right place in the right way for a very long time. Not an overnight success, but one that took a decade or three. The secret of getting on the shortlist is doing your best work fearlessly for a long time before you get on the list, and (especially) doing it even if you’re not on the list.”
I think this is where we stand nearly three decades into our work – doing our best work, fearlessly, and slowly becoming an ‘obvious choice’. In some areas of our work, I think we are on the short list, in others we need to keep building our work and the relationships that support it. At the end of the day, we most want to be on the short list of the families we serve throughout Washington. So, we march on doing our best work, fearlessly every day.

 

Tags: Family Health   Hunger relief   Immunization   Policy   Seth Godin   Washington state   

Full Circle: The Power of Summer Meals

Last Friday, several of us from WithinReach took part in an event to launch the Summer Meals Program. The event was hosted by Jefferson Community Center on Beacon Hill in Seattle. Like other community centers, schools and parks across the state, Jefferson Community Center operates a Summer Meals site, where kids and teens from local day camps and the surrounding neighborhood can eat free, healthy meals through the summer.

The event was super fun! In addition to our friends from the City of Seattle and United Way of King County, Seattle Seahawk football player Bruce Irvin, and Blitz were in the crowd. After the program was officially launched and the kids had eaten a healthy lunch, it was time for pictures and autographs with Bruce and Blitz.

You can be sure we didn’t miss our chance to snap a few photos ourselves! When I asked Bruce Irvin if we could see his World Champion ring, he took it off and let us try it on and take pictures of it – how crazy is that! I feel almost famous just saying I’ve HELD a Super Bowl ring!

This was all very exciting, but it was actually an impressive young woman, named Temesgen Melashu, who reminded me of the power of summer meals. I noticed Temesgen enthusiastically inviting kids into the line for lunch, and making sure they sanitized their hands before picking out their meal.

SM_KickOff_Kay_Blog-251As we chatted, I learned that Temesgen works for the City of Seattle as a Summer Meals Site Monitor, helping sites provide the best program possible for kids. She told me that she loves the Summer Meals program, not only because she sees how happy the kids are eating the meals, but because she remembers how much the program meant to her when she was younger.

She said, “working with the Summer Meals program is sort of full circle for me – I came to sites like this when I was growing up. I know from my own experience how important these meals are”. I asked Temesgen what she will do when her summer work is over. She told me that she is headed to Seattle Pacific University in the Fall to study Communications or Sociology, with the eventual goal of getting her Master of Public Health degree.

For me, that’s full circle. I looked around as we spoke and realized that the room at Jefferson Community Center was filled with Temesgen Melashus – 100 or more young kids with amazing potential to learn, grow, and lead. And, the nutritious food they eat through the Summer Meals program is key to helping them realize this potential.

Bruce Irvin told the kids that being a professional athlete and a new dad has made him realize more than ever how important it is to eat good, healthy food. He said, “who knows, maybe there is a 1st or 2nd draft NFL player right here in this room?!” Yes – from Summer Meals to Seattle Pacific University, or Summer Meals to the Seahawks – it’s a BIG WIN!

 

 

Tags: summer meals   Washington state   

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